Bathroom Electrical Outlet

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Bathroom Electrical Outlet

Next Up Replacing Outlets Replacing outlets with safer GFCI outlets is a simple project for beginner DIYers to bring their kitchen and bathroom outlets up to code. One GFCI outlet at the beginning of a circuit protects all the remaining outlets on that circuit. Installing a GFCI Outlet To reduce the risk of electrical shock in the wet areas of your home, install a GFCI outlet. Use these step-by-step instructions to easily install a GFCI outlet in no time. Install a GFCI Outlet Add protection to electrical outlets by installing a ground fault circuit interrupter. How to Make an Overhead Power Strip One of the challenges of using a router is keeping the cord out of the way. Use these instructions to make a hinged panel for a power strip — it’ll provide power and keep the cord out of the way. How to Replace an Electrical Outlet Receptacle At Disaster House, we invited heavy-metal rock band Slaughter to overload our electrical system. We had the band to hook up all of their electronics to a single 20-amp outlet just to see it blow. How to Install a Three-Way Switch and Wire a Circuit Typically used for hallways and staircases, three-way switches are used in instances where two separate switches control one. Use these step-by-step instructions to install a three-way switch and wire a circuit. How to Hide Wiring Behind Baseboard or Install a Raceway Running wires behind baseboard or hiding them in raceways not only looks more attractive but also protects the wires from damage. Follow these steps to conceal wires in your home. How to Install a Dimmer Switch Learn how to replace a standard light switch with a dimmer switch. How to Build a New Soffit Soffits are the underside of any construction element and are crucial for combining two rooms into one. Learn how to construct a new soffit with these easy step-by-step directions. How to Use Conduit Use these step-by-step instructions and learn how conduit can be used instead of a grounding wire.
bathroom electrical outlet 1

Bathroom Electrical Outlet

Replacing Outlets Replacing outlets with safer GFCI outlets is a simple project for beginner DIYers to bring their kitchen and bathroom outlets up to code. One GFCI outlet at the beginning of a circuit protects all the remaining outlets on that circuit. Installing a GFCI Outlet To reduce the risk of electrical shock in the wet areas of your home, install a GFCI outlet. Use these step-by-step instructions to easily install a GFCI outlet in no time. Install a GFCI Outlet Add protection to electrical outlets by installing a ground fault circuit interrupter. How to Make an Overhead Power Strip One of the challenges of using a router is keeping the cord out of the way. Use these instructions to make a hinged panel for a power strip — it’ll provide power and keep the cord out of the way. How to Replace an Electrical Outlet Receptacle At Disaster House, we invited heavy-metal rock band Slaughter to overload our electrical system. We had the band to hook up all of their electronics to a single 20-amp outlet just to see it blow. How to Install a Three-Way Switch and Wire a Circuit Typically used for hallways and staircases, three-way switches are used in instances where two separate switches control one. Use these step-by-step instructions to install a three-way switch and wire a circuit. How to Hide Wiring Behind Baseboard or Install a Raceway Running wires behind baseboard or hiding them in raceways not only looks more attractive but also protects the wires from damage. Follow these steps to conceal wires in your home. How to Install a Dimmer Switch Learn how to replace a standard light switch with a dimmer switch. How to Build a New Soffit Soffits are the underside of any construction element and are crucial for combining two rooms into one. Learn how to construct a new soffit with these easy step-by-step directions. How to Use Conduit Use these step-by-step instructions and learn how conduit can be used instead of a grounding wire.
bathroom electrical outlet 2

Bathroom Electrical Outlet

The National Electric Code requires that all electrical outlets near sources of water, such as in a kitchen, bathroom, outside, or in a garage, must have Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) receptacles installed. The purpose of a GFCI receptacle is to terminate power supply in the event of an accident such as dropping an electrical device in a body of water. A GFCI receptacle works by measuring the electricity flowing from the hot wire, through the electrical device, and into the neutral wire. With a normally operating electrical device the power levels from the hot wire and into the neutral wire will be the same. If an electrical device was to be dropped into a body of water and grounded out the GFCI receptacle would detect power usage from the hot wire and recognize that the electricity is not returning to the neutral wire and would instantly trip the internal breaker. Breaking power in the event of unwanted power usage will reduce the risk of electrical shock and possibly a fire. To determine if you have a GFCI receptacle installed already look for the test and reset buttons on your receptacle. If none are present you do not have a GFCI receptacle installed. If you do have a GFCI already installed use these buttons to test the receptacle monthly. Before working with any electrical circuits in your house know and understand the risks involved. Electricity is dangerous and can cause severe injury or death if handled improperly. Research and understand what you are doing before you do it and consult a professional if needed. Luckily installing a GFCI receptacle is easy. Make sure the electricity is turned off to the receptacle before working on it. Remove the old receptacle with a screwdriver and disconnect the wires from the back. Separate the wires completely so that all of the exposed ends are away from each other and are not touching. A GFCI receptacle needs to be installed first in the circuit. Meaning that if there are multiple receptacles in the circuit the electricity must travel through the GFCI receptacle first before it goes to any of the other receptacles or lights on the circuit. This will extend the protection of the GFCI to everything else in the circuit. If there are two sets of wires present you need to determine what set of wires is the power source and what set goes to the next receptacle or light in the circuit. With the wires spread apart and not touching turn the electricity back on to the circuit. Use a multimeter to determine what set of wires is powered. Turn the electricity back off and start installing the GFCI receptacle. There are two locations to install the wires. The wires that were powered must be connected to the LINE connections on the GFCI receptacle. The wires going to the next device go to the LOAD connections. If only one set of wires is present connect them to the LINE side only. The connections are made in the same way as a regular receptacle. The white neutral wire goes to the white screw and the black hot wire goes to the brass or gold looking screw. If a ground wire is present connect it to the green ground screw. Another reason to upgrade to a GFCI receptacle is it will add grounding protection to the receptacle in the event that there is no ground wire present. This is no longer a common occurrence these days but for older homes it could be something you encounter. The wiring in some older homes do not include a ground wire and thus will have non grounded receptacles installed. Install the GFCi receptacle into the wall box like normal. Turn the electricity back on to the circuit and test the receptacle with the test and reset buttons. That’s it. This is easy enough that anyone can do it but like mentioned before, if you are still unsure about what you are doing consult a professional.
bathroom electrical outlet 3

Bathroom Electrical Outlet

Spaces Images / Getty Images Bathrooms are damp and can use a lot of power. This creates special needs when it comes to wiring. This article will help you plan for appropriate electrical wiring to cover lighting, airflow, and safety devices in your bathroom. Everything from watertight lighting fixtures in bathing areas to effective ventilation to GFCI outlets for safety must be considered.LightingWe all know that bathrooms tend to be one of the darker rooms of the house. For that reason, plenty of lights should be installed to provide enough general illumination but also to enhance areas like mirrors, showers, closets, and bathtub areas.Bath and shower areas must have special fixtures. Light fixtures for these areas carry one of two ratings: damp locations and wet locations. A bathing area, sometimes called the “shower zone,” includes the tub or shower area itself and the adjacent room area measured 3 feet horizontally from the rim of the tub or shower stall (that is, measuring straight out into the room) and 8 feet vertically from the tub rim (measuring straight up). Any light fixture in this zone must be at least rated for damp locations. However, if the fixture is potentially subject to spray from the shower, it must be a rated for wet locations. When it comes to lighting around the mirror, side lights are best. Overhead lighting, especially recessed lights, leave your face in shadow when you get close to the mirror. They also highlight how much your hair is thinning (isn't it better not to know?). Side lights, such as wall sconces or vertical strip lights, can be combined with lights mounted to the wall above the mirror for fuller illumination. Ventilation FansBathrooms are notorious for being moist, and some don't have windows to remove the moisture and odors. Even if you have a window, a bathroom vent fan is more effective at exhausting moisture and odors, and you don't lose as much heat in the winter. Vent fans are required in all new bathrooms and remodels. You can install a vent fan with a built-in heater, but this has different wiring requirements than a standard fan without a heater (we'll get to the wiring in a minute). Power OutletsAll outlets or receptacles in a bathroom must be GFCI-protected. This is a critical safety device to help prevent shock hazards, a very real concern in a bathroom. You can provide GFCI protection with a GFCI circuit breaker or by installing one or more GFCI outlets on the receptacle circuit. When using a single GFCI outlet for protection, it must be wired for “multiple-location” protection so that it protects all of the outlets downstream on the same circuit. Bathroom CircuitsA basic wiring plan for a bathroom includes a 20-amp, GFCI-protected circuit for the receptacles and a 15-amp general lighting circuit for the switches, light fixtures, and vent fan. In some areas, the lighting and receptacles must be on separate circuits so that if a receptacle trips the circuit breaker the lights won't go out. In other areas, it's permissible to install the lighting, receptacles, and a standard vent fan on a single 20-amp circuit, provided the circuit serves only the bathroom and not other rooms. If the vent fan has a built-in heater, it must have its own 20-amp circuit. This is called a “dedicated” circuit because it serves only one appliance or fixture. Heat lamps, wall heaters, and other built-in heating appliances may also require dedicated circuits.   Learn about bathroom wiring requirements in your area by contacting the local building department.  Read More

Bathroom Electrical Outlet

Bathroom Electrical Outlet
Bathroom Electrical Outlet
Bathroom Electrical Outlet

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