Repairing Laminate Flooring

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Repairing Laminate Flooring

Repairing Laminate Flooring Facebook Twitter One of the many great things about Shaw Laminate Flooring is that repairs (if you need them) are fast and easy. Skeptical? Keep reading. “Oops” happens. Repairing our Laminate flooring is simple. In the event that accidental damage occurs to one of the planks, minor scratches or dents can be repaired using color-fill materials that can be found at a local home center. These special filler materials will need to be color coordinated with your floor. When matched properly, the repaired area is often invisible. Glueless Laminate makes replacing individual boards a snap. Our glueless Laminate may be assembled and disassembled several times. Carefully disassembled glueless joints will retain their original locking integrity during re-assembly. New replacement plank(s) should be acclimated in the replacement area for at least 72 hours, to allow them to equalize to the conditions of the flooring in the room where the replacement(s) will take place. Remove baseboard, wall base, or quarter-round as needed to replace the damaged board(s). Take the flooring apart, one row at a time, by lifting the rows to detach them and then separating the individual boards. Be sure to stack the individual planks in the proper order for re-installation. This usually eliminates the need to cut planks for start or end of the row lengths. Replace the damaged board with a piece from the edge of the original installation. Insert the properly acclimated new plank(s) along the outer edge of the original flooring installation during re-assembly. This minimizes the chance that a newer plank might stand out from the wear condition of the original installation. Re-install the baseboard, wall base, or quarter round, and the replacement-repair is complete. Related Content Laminate Warranty Highlights We already create the most durable Laminate flooring you can buy. We offer 15-year, 20-year, 25-year and 30 year warranties for Laminate products used in your home. Download Your Shaw Laminate Warranties How to Clean Laminate Floors Shaw Laminate Flooring is naturally durable, making cleaning a breeze. Here, we’re going to give you the crash course on how to care for your Laminate flooring and keep it looking great for years. Keeping Your Shaw Laminate Floor Clean Featured Promo MegaTrends in Home Decor Discover MegaTrends Watch Video 70s and 80s Inspiration for your Living Room Your room doesn’t have to look like a time capsule Watch Video
repairing laminate flooring 1

Repairing Laminate Flooring

Repairing Laminate Flooring Facebook Twitter One of the many great things about Shaw Laminate Flooring is that repairs (if you need them) are fast and easy. Skeptical? Keep reading. “Oops” happens. Repairing our Laminate flooring is simple. In the event that accidental damage occurs to one of the planks, minor scratches or dents can be repaired using color-fill materials that can be found at a local home center. These special filler materials will need to be color coordinated with your floor. When matched properly, the repaired area is often invisible. Glueless Laminate makes replacing individual boards a snap. Our glueless Laminate may be assembled and disassembled several times. Carefully disassembled glueless joints will retain their original locking integrity during re-assembly. New replacement plank(s) should be acclimated in the replacement area for at least 72 hours, to allow them to equalize to the conditions of the flooring in the room where the replacement(s) will take place. Remove baseboard, wall base, or quarter-round as needed to replace the damaged board(s). Take the flooring apart, one row at a time, by lifting the rows to detach them and then separating the individual boards. Be sure to stack the individual planks in the proper order for re-installation. This usually eliminates the need to cut planks for start or end of the row lengths. Replace the damaged board with a piece from the edge of the original installation. Insert the properly acclimated new plank(s) along the outer edge of the original flooring installation during re-assembly. This minimizes the chance that a newer plank might stand out from the wear condition of the original installation. Re-install the baseboard, wall base, or quarter round, and the replacement-repair is complete.
repairing laminate flooring 2

Repairing Laminate Flooring

Repair minor damage in laminate flooring Drop a knife or other sharp-edged item and you’ll get an instant chip in your laminate floor. But you don’t need to call in a pro, because this repair is strictly DIY. If you have the chip or an extra plank, take it to a home center or flooring supplier and match it up with a tube of laminate floor patching material. You may have to buy the two closest colors and mix them to match. While you’re there, buy a matching brand of cleaning solvent. Clean the flooring with the solvent and let it dry. Next, squeeze a dollop of filler onto a scrap piece of flooring or a mixing board and mix it with a putty knife until it begins to dry (Photo 1). Then press a shallow layer into the chip. Don’t try to fill the entire chip in one application. Clean off any excess with solvent. Let the first coat set for one hour before applying the next. After the filler hardens, use a knife to duplicate the grain pattern. Darken the cuts with furniture touch-up markers (Photo 2).
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Repairing Laminate Flooring

I would like to have either laminate flooring or engineered hardwood flooring in my living room, dining room, and family room. I don’t have a pet, but I have teen age children. At first I wanted to have hardwood floor, but I am thinking of getting laminate floor now just because I don’t want to deal with dents and scratches and fading. We are rough on floors. However, possibility of getting mold growing underneath floated laminate floor worries me a bit because my son is allergic to mold. Could mold grow underneath laminate floor more than hardwood? Any information would be much appreciated. Reply
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Repairing Laminate Flooring

How to Clean Laminate Floors Shaw Laminate Flooring is naturally durable, making cleaning a breeze. Here, we’re going to give you the crash course on how to care for your Laminate flooring and keep it looking great for years. Keeping Your Shaw Laminate Floor Clean
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Repairing Laminate Flooring

I would like to have either laminate flooring or engineered hardwood flooring in my living room, dining room, and family room. I don’t have a pet, but I have teen age children. At first I wanted to have hardwood floor, but I am thinking of getting laminate floor now just because I don’t want to deal with dents and scratches and fading. We are rough on floors. However, possibility of getting mold growing underneath floated laminate floor worries me a bit because my son is allergic to mold. Could mold grow underneath laminate floor more than hardwood? Any information would be much appreciated.
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One of the many great things about Shaw Laminate Flooring is that repairs (if you need them) are fast and easy. Skeptical? Keep reading. “Oops” happens. Repairing our Laminate flooring is simple. In the event that accidental damage occurs to one of the planks, minor scratches or dents can be repaired using color-fill materials that can be found at a local home center. These special filler materials will need to be color coordinated with your floor. When matched properly, the repaired area is often invisible.
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Gapping is not common with laminate flooring. Gapping is a situation in which the laminate flooring boards tend to pull away from one another resulting in gaps between the boards. This situation will occur if the temperature drops to a point way below what is considered normal (60°-80°). For this reason, it is very important to acclimatize your flooring to the room temperature and conditions of the room in which the laminate is to be installed, before installation.
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Peaking refers to a situation in which the laminate floor boards push up against each other and result in high points at the joints. There are a number of reasons why this can happen. The most common cause of peaking is a lack of expansion space between the laminate floor and the walls around the perimeter of the installation, or a lack of expansion space between the laminate floor and laminate moldings. This situation can be easily remedied. Simply follow the peaking board’s perpendicular to the wall or molding, remove the necessary molding- if against the wall, remove the baseboard and cutout a section or enough of the laminate board that meets the wall or molding that will give the floor more space to expand. (Diagram 1 & 2) The peaking will not however dissipate immediately, it maybe necessary to place a weighted object on the peaking areas for a period of time.
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Hey Tammy, When installing over concrete the North American Laminate Flooring Association and our Dream Home laminate instructions suggest applying a layer of polyethylene sheeting over the concrete. We recommend using our Dream Home 6 mil polyethylene sheeting for maximum moisture protection. The sheeting should completely cover the concrete. When installing the sheeting, overlap any seams of the sheeting by 6″? and tape with duct tape. The polyethylene sheeting will block the moisture in the concrete from affecting the laminate flooring. After applying the poly sheeting the Eco Silent Sound underlayment will go on next. The Eco Silent Sound underlayment will only block up to 4lbs of moisture in concrete, so adding the poly sheeting under it will give you full moisture protection. Thanks for your inquiry, and I hope this helps! Reply

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